Allegations of Forced Sterilizations in Peru

Allegations of Forced Sterilizations in Peru



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Bar Refaeli: Liv

Bar Refaeli: Liv

On August 11, 2016, the Israeli top girl gave birth to a little girl named Liv

How can I raise a gracious loser? (ages 5 to 8)

How can I raise a gracious loser? (ages 5 to 8)

While it's perfectly natural for your child to be disappointed when she loses something she's worked hard for, like the championship soccer game, it is important for her to learn to accept loss without feelings of bitterness or low self-esteem. A child who doesn't learn to lose graciously has a hard time making friends and is often frustrated by failures. Here are some ways to encourage a sourpuss to sweeten up.

  • Play on your child's sense of empathy. At this age, she's starting to develop the ability to put herself in another person's place. She can now begin to understand that getting angry when she doesn't win hurts the feelings of the people she's playing with. Ask her to think about how it would feel if someone got angry at her when she did something she was proud of. Tell her that it's okay to be sad about losing, but she should try not to hurt others because of it.
  • Play cooperative games. Noncompetitive games eliminate winning and losing altogether and help your child learn what it's like to play on a team. Try hitting a balloon back and forth, or play a game of Chinese checkers in which the idea is to get your marbles on her side and hers on your side at roughly the same time. As children get older, they will have to start playing with teammates to accomplish a common goal, and cooperative games give them a great foundation for this.
  • Emphasize effort, skill, and fun. It's trite but true: "It's not whether you win or lose but how you play the game." Your job is to get your child to take this adage to heart. After she plays a game with a friend, ask, "Did you have a good time?" instead of "Who won?" Offer praise for anything done well, no matter how small it may seem. The more you can get your child thinking about developing the skills needed to be a good player — regardless of the outcome — the less important winning becomes.
  • Teach your child how to win and lose well. Show her what it means to be a good winner and a good loser. Tell her that good winners don't brag about victories or make fun of another player's skills. And help her become a good loser by giving her opportunities to lose as she plays against you. It seems harsh, but she'll never learn the skill if she doesn't practice it. Most important, don't let her see you being a poor sport. Take your losses well, and always congratulate the winner.

If your child regularly "loses it" when she loses, you might need to take a break from game playing altogether. Turn the focus to other areas of her life that she can feel good about. And teach her that mistakes are okay by not reacting harshly when she makes one. For example, instead of getting angry about a bad grade in school, talk about what she can do to do better. In time, you should see some improvement.



Wacky Beliefs around Baby Sex: Belly Shape

Wacky Beliefs around Baby Sex: Belly Shape

Pointy belly or round belly?

Pointy belly or round belly? According to our grandmothers, a round belly announces a girl. For the boy, it's a pointed belly. Do you wear your baby "high"? This is the sign that you are waiting for a girl ... the boy is "down".
As the weight of beliefs popular is not so reliable, you should know that the shape of the belly depends primarily on your physique, the way your baby is positioned in utero and also the number of your pregnancies. If it's your first baby, your belly will tend to be sharp because your abdominal muscles are not relaxed yet. And that's scientific for the shot!

Weight and height of the child after 1 year

Ask a preschooler how her day was and you're likely to get a one-word answer. It's hard for little minds to reflect on what's happened in their lives – especially when half the time they can't even be bothered to slow down and listen to your questions. But sharing what you do when you're away from each other is an important way to connect with and support your child when you're together. Use these ideas to help your preschooler open up.

Embrace dramatic play

Preschoolers love to play pretend! Instead of waiting for your child to recount the details of her day, initiate a game of "school." Ask your child to be the teacher while you're the student. Observe what your child has you do in the make-believe classroom. This will likely give you a glimpse into your child's school routines. Just remember not to take everything your child does as truth – no matter what situation, preschoolers are prone to be fantastical.

If you have questions about where the line between imaginary and real is, ask your preschooler. These questions can be a great way to help teach your child about fact versus fiction. They can even serve as a conversation starter that actually gets kids talking about their day – on their terms.

Share a "rose" and a "thorn"

Though we may be dying to hear all about what our kids did at school, kids often need some time to process and decompress. Instead of asking questions right after school, wait until dinnertime to prompt your child to share about her day. Teach your child to share a "rose" (something that went well) and a "thorn" (something that was hard). This routine helps kids reflect on specific moments from their time at school, instead of answering the open-ended, "How was your day at school?" As a result, you'll likely to get more than just "fine" as an answer.

Talk about your day

Just as we're curious about our kids' days, our kids are curious about our days too! Model how to give an overview by outlining what you did while your child was at school. No need to share details of boring meetings or endless loads of laundry – just an overview of highlights will do the trick. Making sharing about your days part of your routine can bring you closer to your child while creating a designated time for connecting.

Find out more about how to raise an articulate child and try fun activities to promote listening skills.

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How To HACK ANY Screen Time Part: 2

No-Bake Chocolate Cookies, Quick Dessert

No-Bake Chocolate Cookies, Quick Dessert


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